Associated Researchers

Victor De Gruttola
Victor De Gruttola
victor@sdac.harvard.edu

Dr. De Gruttola is a Professor of Biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research activities focus on developments of statistical methods for an appropriate public health response to the AIDS epidemic. Along with statistical methodology, his work involves public health surveillance systems, medical issues surrounding HIV infection, and concerns of communities most affected by the epidemic. The goals of his research include forecasting future AIDS incidence, developing strategies for clinical research on HIV infection, and evaluating the public health impact of antiretroviral treatment.


Scott Dryden-Peterson
Scott Dryden-Peterson
scott_peterson@post.harvard.edu

Dr. Dryden-Peterson is an Attending Physician in Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a Research Associate at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His projects include research related to the delivery of care to HIV-infected pregnant women in Botswana and to improving outcomes for the largely HIV-uninfected infants born to these women. He is co-founder of Botswana Oncology Global Outreach (BOTSOGO) and leads a number of projects evaluating the role of HIV in the incidence and outcomes of cancer in Botswana.


Max Essex
Max Essex
messex@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Essex is the Mary Lasker Professor of Health Sciences at Harvard University. He is also Chair of the Harvard AIDS Initiative and the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership. His lab in Boston conducts research on the virology, immunobiology, and molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 viruses, especially the HIV-1C of southern Africa. Essex and colleagues study the evolution of new viruses, both circulating recombinant forms and variants that emerge by accumulation of mutations in relation to disease pathogenesis, drug efficacy, and transmission efficiency.

The laboratory in Gaborone, Botswana supports field trials in southern Africa. Prevention of new HIV infections is a top priority. The Botswana Combination Prevention Project (BCPP) is a large clinical trial currently underway to evaluate the potential of antiretroviral drugs in treatment as prevention (TasP). Other research areas include prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and prevention of increased disease and mortality in HIV-uninfected infants born to infected mothers. Essex and colleagues are also looking at the possible role of human genetics in increasing or decreasing risk of HIV infection and rate of AIDS progression once infected.


Wafaie Fawzi
Wafaie Fawzi
mina@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Fawzi is Chair of the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He conducts research in the areas of maternal, neonatal, child health, and infectious diseases, with an emphasis on nutritional factors. Working in Tanzania, Uganda, India, Brazil, and other developing countries, he and colleagues examine the inter-relationships of nutrition, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and maternal and child health, including the efficacy of specific micronutrient interventions provided to pregnant women and/or children. In addition, his group examines the role of micronutrient status, other aspects of nutritional status and antiretroviral drugs on the rate of HIV disease progression among adults and children and the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1.


Simani Gaseitsiwe
Simani Gaseitsiwe
sgaseits@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Gaseitsiwe is the Deputy Laboratory Research Director at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership (BHP) and a Research Associate in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. At the BHP, he is involved with capacity building through the mentorship of students and postdocs. His interest is in infection biology and spans HIV, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and Hepatitis B. His current research focuses on drug resistance studies in HIV-1C infection and molecular characterization of Hepatitis B in HIV-infected patients in Botswana.


Michael Hughes
Michael Hughes
mhughes@sdac.harvard.edu

Dr. Hughes is a Professor of Biostatistics and Director of the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR) at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research focuses on statistical methods related to the design and analysis of clinical trials and observational studies, particularly for HIV research. He is well known for his work on the development of methods for evaluating surrogate markers using meta-analysis of results from a number of clinical trials. Dr. Hughes is the Principal Investigator of the Statistical and Data Management Center (SDMC) of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG).


Phyllis Kanki
Phyllis Kanki
pkanki@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Kanki is a Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. A virologist with recognized expertise in the pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of HIV in Africa, she has led AIDS research programs in Senegal for over 20 years. She and her lab provided the initial characterization of HIV-2 and demonstrated reduced virulence, transmission, and progression to disease and interactions with HIV-1 subtypes from West Africa. From 2004 to 2012, she led Harvard’s program for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Nigeria, Tanzania, and Botswana. Harvard PEPFAR provided treatment to over 150,000 patients. Dr. Kanki’s operational research deals with HIV co-infections, determinants of ART efficacy, evaluation of PMTCT interventions, and HIV drug resistance. She leads the Harvard component of the Medical Education Partnership in Nigeria, a consortium of six Nigerian medical schools working towards improving curriculum and research capacity.


Saidi Kapiga
Saidi Kapiga
skapiga@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Kapiga is a faculty member at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). As a clinical epidemiologist, he investigates the biological and social factors associated with increased risk and vulnerability to HIV infection. He is the Scientific Director of the Mwanza Intervention Trials Unit (MITU), which was established by the LSHTM in partnership with the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research. MITU has carried out research studies on the epidemiology and control of HIV and other sexual health problems, with a particular focus on randomised controlled trials of prevention interventions.


Daniel Kuritzkes
Daniel Kuritzkes
dkuritzkes@partners.org

Dr. Kuritzkes is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is also the Network Chair/Principal Investigator of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). He has published extensively on antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance in HIV-1 infection. His primary research interests are HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs, viral fitness, viral tropism, and HIV-1 persistence and eradication.


Tun-Hou Lee
Tun-Hou Lee
tunhoule@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Lee is a Professor of Virology at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public. His research interests are virus-specific antigens and their association with disease manifestations, viral replication, and host-virus interactions, with particular focus on human and related primate retroviruses. Currently, Dr. Lee is focusing on the modification of the antigenicity of HIV envelope protein for vaccine development.


Shahin Lockman
Shahin Lockman
slockman@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Lockman is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women’s Hospital and adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has conducted research in Botswana since 1996, focusing on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV; antiretroviral treatment following PMTCT; understanding the role of HIV- and antiretroviral-exposure on the health and neurodevelopment of HIV-exposed/uninfected infants; and optimizing the health of HIV-infected mothers and HIV-exposed and infected children. She co-leads a Clinical Trials Unit that conducts HIV treatment and prevention trials among adults and children in Botswana and helps lead a community-randomized study of HIV-prevention interventions.


Yichen Lu
Yichen Lu
yichen@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Lu is a Principal Research Scientist at the Harvard AIDS Initiative. He serves as the Executive Director of Nanfang Vaccine Center, a non-profit organization that promotes vaccine research and development in developing countries. He is also the president of Haikou VTI Biological Institute in Hainan Island, China. Dr. Lu’s laboratory focuses on vaccine research and development, particularly T-cell vaccines.


Iain MacLeod
Iain MacLeod
imacleod@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. MacLeod is a molecular virologist and Research Associate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he has been part of the Essex Laboratory since 2008. His research interests include diagnostic virology for resource-limited settings, particularly the development of a simple, low-cost and highly sensitive assay for HIV drug resistance. He also investigates various aspects of HPV/HIV co-infection and how immune activation in response to HPV may be a risk factor for HIV acquisition and transmission.


Joe Makhema
Joseph Makhema
jmakhema@bhp.org.bw

Dr. Makhema is Chief Executive Officer of the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership (BHP), where he oversees all clinical research and training projects. He joined BHP as Senior Clinical Research Manager and Co-Director in 2003. He became BHP Project Director in 2006. A specialist physician by training, he also participates in the clinical conduct of research trials, capacity building, and training initiatives at the BHP.


Richard Marlink
Richard Marlink
marlink@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Marlink leads the Rutgers Global Health Institute. Prior to that, he was a Professor of Public Health Practice in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. He has directed HIV/AIDS-related training, infrastructure development, and research in Botswana, Brazil, Côte d’Ivoire, Mozambique, Puerto Rico, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand and Zambia. His area of expertise is in the implementation, scale-up, and evaluation of HIV care and treatment programs in Africa.


Mosepele Mosepele
Mosepele Mosepele
mosepele@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Mosepele is a Research Fellow in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. He conducts research in Botswana that focuses on the epidemiology of HIV and end-organ dysfunction, with major emphasis on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and neurocognitive impairment. His research in Boston explores the application of cholesterol guidelines and use of statin therapy in preventing CVD among HIV-infected patients.


Rosemary Musonda
Rosemary Musonda
rmusonda@bhp.org.bw

Dr. Musonda is the Laboratory Director at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute and a Research Associate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her main interests are in understanding the molecular structure of HIV, its pathogenesis, and the nature of host immunity to the virus. She is involved with capacity building and training young researchers in Africa. Dr. Musonda holds several grants dedicated to postgraduate training of African scientists in southern Africa.


Vladimir Novitsky
Vladimir Novitsky
vnovi@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Novitsky is a Principle Research Scientist in the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, where he has been researching HIV since 1996. His research is focused on the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1C, the subtype affecting populations in southern Africa. In particular, he studies HIV-1C transmission dynamics in conjunction with the research at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership.


Stephen J. O'Brien
Stephen J. O’Brien

 

Dr. O’Brien served as Chief of the Laboratory of Genomic Diversity at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1986-2011. In 2011, he joined the Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University as Chief Scientific Officer. His research interests and expertise span human and comparative genomics, genetic epidemiology, HIV/AIDS, retro-virology, bioinformatics, biodiversity and species conservation. In collaboration with researchers at HAI, he is identifying human genetic loci that influence susceptibility to HIV infection, disease progression, and immune response.


Marcello PaganoMarcello Pagano
pagano@biostat.harvard.edu

Dr. Pagano is a Professor of Statistical Computing at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research interests include the epidemiology of HIV infection, especially biostatistical methods for the surveillance of the epidemic and associated testing methodology. In regards to surveillance methods, he has concentrated on modeling the effects of reporting delay; on refining back-calculation methods, including research on how to overcome this method’s shortcoming when it comes to its inability to evaluate HIV infection in the recent (last 3 or 4 years) past; on how to handle doubly censored observations; longitudinal, observational studies; and economical methods for making the blood supply safer.


Rebeca Plank
Rebeca Plank
rplank@partners.org

Dr. Plank is an Infectious Disease physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a Research Associate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her research focuses on prevention of HIV infections in resource-limited settings, including the acceptability and uptake of treatment as prevention and the feasibility and safety of early infant male circumcision as part of comprehensive HIV prevention strategies in Botswana and Kenya.


Kate Powis
Kathleen Powis
kpowis@partners.org

Dr. Powis holds clinical appointments in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and a Research Associate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on multiple clinical trials at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership. Her research interests include preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission and the HIV-free survival of HIV-exposed uninfected infants.


Christopher Rowley
Christopher Rowley
crowley@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Rowley is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, a member of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and a Research Associate in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He is also the Director of HIV Clinical Services at Outer Cape Health Services in Provincetown. His laboratory work focuses on developing new strategies for the evaluation of HIV drug resistance in resource-limited settings.


Roger Shapiro
Roger Shapiro
rshapiro@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Shapiro is an Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, as well as an Associate Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Since 1999, he has been working with the Botswana Harvard Partnership on studies to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) and to improve childhood survival. In Botswana, he has led clinical trials to evaluate optimal antiretroviral strategies for PMTCT at delivery and during breastfeeding; a trial to study the efficacy of prophylactic cotrimoxazole among HIV-exposed uninfected infants; and several studies to evaluate the mechanisms by which antiretrovirals impact adverse birth outcomes. He leads a study to evaluate early treatment for HIV+ infants. Dr. Shapiro also serves as a scientific advisor to the World Health Organization for the creation of guidelines for PMTCT, infant feeding, and adult and pediatric HIV treatment.


Eric Joel Tchetgen Tchetgen
Eric Joel Tchetgen Tchetgen
etchetge@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Tchetgen Tchetgen is a Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiologic Methods at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His primary areas of interest are semi-parametric efficiency theory with application to causal inference, missing data problems, statistical genetics, and mixed model theory. In general, his work concerns the development of statistical and epidemiologic methods that make the most efficient use of information contained in data collected by scientific investigators, while avoiding unnecessary assumptions about the underlying data generating mechanism. Methods he has developed allow investigators to account for selection bias due to incomplete data, unobserved confounding, and spillover effects that may be present when the outcome of a given person may be influenced by the exposure of another.


Mark Wainberg
Mark Wainberg
mark.wainberg@mcgill.ca

Dr. Wainberg is Director of the McGill University AIDS Centre and Professor of Medicine and Microbiology at McGill University in Montreal. He served as President of the International AIDS Society from 1998 to 2000. His lab focuses on the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes of HIV-1 in regard to inhibition by anti-viral drugs, drug resistance, and differences in HIV drug resistance profiles based on viral subtype. Dr. Wainberg’s lab has accumulated extensive dat “href=”mailto: to suggest that it may not be possible for HIV to develop resistance against the integrase inhibitor known as Dolutegravir. Wainberg has proposed that the latter compound could have utility in HIV cure strategies.


Rui Wang
Rui Wang
rwang@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Wang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on the development and application of statistical methods for the design and analysis of clinical trials. Her current research includes the development of statistical methods for HIV prevention, including improving accuracy and efficiency of HIV cross-sectional incidence estimation and design and analysis of cluster randomized trials, addressing issues such as how the complex correlation structure within clusters affects the sample size and power of the trial, and how to analyze data from such trials efficiently, taking into account the correlation structure and missing data.


C. William Wester
C. William Wester
william.wester@vanderbilt.edu

Dr. Wester is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and a faculty member of the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH). His research activities focus on long-term complications of HIV (with a focus on HIV-associated kidney disease) among HIV-infected adults residing in resource-limited settings, with a particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa. He also conducts implementation science research identifying novel ways to deliver high quality, sustainable care in such settings.


Kathleen Wirth
Kathleen Wirth
kwirth@hsph.harvard.edu

Dr. Wirth is a Research Scientist with a joint appointment in the Epidemiology and Immunology and Infectious Diseases Departments at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She serves as the lead epidemiologist on the Botswana Combination Prevention Project. Dr. Wirth is also collaborating on a mixed-methods study evaluating Botswana’s National Safe Male Circumcision Program. In addition to her fieldwork, she is involved in the development and application of instrumental variable techniques for regression analysis in the presence of unmeasured confounding and non-ignorable bias.


Rebecca Zash
Rebecca Zash
rzash@bidmc.harvard.edu

Dr. Zash is an Infectious Diseases Fellow and Associate Director for the Global Health Residency program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a Research Associate at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her research interests include understanding and preventing stillbirth and preterm delivery among HIV-infected women, the impact of HIV on the cardiovascular system during pregnancy, monitoring drug safety in pregnancy in resource limited settings, and using birth surveillance to study congenital abnormalities among HIV-exposed infants.