Tag Archives: TasP

Updates on Efforts to Combat the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

By Elliot Eton

(Eton spent a gap year working with HAI in Boston and Botswana. He’s now a freshman at Harvard. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of Harvard Science Review.)

The target is 2030. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has ambitiously set 2030 as the year by which we should achieve the end of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, which has claimed the lives of 39 million people globally since the first cases were reported in 1981.1 This past year, to help drive united progress and accountability towards the goal, UNAIDS articulated the 90-90-90 targets. If these goals are reached by 2020, UNAIDS predicts, then the AIDS epidemic could come to an end by 2030:

  • Goal 1: “By 2020, 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status.”
  • Goal 2: “By 2020, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy.”
  • Goal 3: “By 2020, 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression.”2

Continue reading in Harvard Science Review.
Title photo by Dominic Chavez

HAI Hosts Treatment as Prevention Workshop

 

How do your define ‘household’ in a culture where extended families split time between town, the farm, and a cattle post? Who else has had trouble enrolling men? What happens if several large, expensive clinical trials deliver completely different results several years from now?

These were some of the important questions asked at the Treatment as Prevention in Africa (TasP Africa) workshop held this May in Gaborone, Botswana. Continue reading