Tag Archives: Kitso

The Botswana Harvard Partnership Turns 20: Q&A with Dr. Joseph Makhema

Dr. Joseph Makhema

The Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership (BHP) was established 20 years ago to help combat HIV/AIDS at the epicenter of the epidemic. At the time, about 37% of pregnant women in Botswana were infected with HIV. Dr. Joseph Makhema was a young physician working what seemed like unending hours at the public hospital in Gaborone, where effective treatment was not yet available. Today, Dr. Makhema is the CEO of the Institute he played an important role in establishing. Martha Henry, Executive Director of HAI, spoke with him about the BHP’s history and future. Continue reading

KITSO Trains over 8,000

KITSO AIDS Training Program

Much has changed in a decade. In 2001, President Festus Mogae of Botswana identified the growing threat of HIV/AIDS as a national crisis and announced that his government would provide free antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to eligible patients. This initiative, at the time without precedent in Africa, posed significant challenges to Botswana’s already overburdened healthcare system, especially in terms of trained medical workers. Few doctors or nurses had experience in HIV/AIDS treatment. Continue reading

Viewpoints: Max Essex

Max Essex photo by dave Cliff

Dr. Max Essex is Chair of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative (HAI), the Lasker Professor of Health Sciences, and Chair of the Botswana-Harvard Partnership for HIV Research and Education (BHP). As the BHP celebrates its 10th anniversary, Martha Henry, Editor of Spotlight, asked Dr. Essex to reflect on past accomplishments and future goals of the BHP. Continue reading

Research & Interventions

Using Nevirapine More Effectively

A study published in the January 11th issue of  found that for mothers given a single dose of nevirapine during labor to reduce the chance of HIV transmission to their children, waiting six months after birth before taking a nevirapine-based antiretroviral treatment dramatically reduced their chances of developing resistance to nevirapine. Continue reading