Profiles

Victor DeGruttolaVictor DeGruttola

Ask most people, “Do you have a purpose in life?” and they’ll pause and stammer. Ask Victor DeGruttola and he answers, “To develop, apply, and use quantitative methods and quantitative thinking to defend the interest of vulnerable people. more…


Scott Dryden-PetersonScott Dryden-Peterson

Since the introduction of antiretroviral treatment in the 1990s, a diagnosis of AIDS no longer means imminent death. Many people with HIV now live long, relatively healthy lives. Mortality rates, however, are still higher in people with HIV and they die younger. Researchers would like to know why. more…


Shahin LockmanShahin Lockman

There are not many couples in which both husband and wife are first authors on a paper in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, but Drs.Roger Shapiro and Shahin Lockman are one of them. more…


Iain MacLeodIain MacLeod

What do chemical warfare and AIDS research have in common? Both are subjects that Dr. Iain MacLeod, a research fellow in the Essex Lab, has studied extensively. more…


Richard MarlinkRichard Marllink

When he was an intern in New York City in 1980, Dr. Richard Marlink knew something was going on, he just didn’t know what. The hospital where he worked, St. Vincent’s, served patients from Harlem to Greenwich Village. more…


Mosepele MosepeleMosepele Mosepele

It started in preschool for Mosepele Mosepele. His mother was an Operating Room (OR) nurse in the Mahalapye District Hospital in Botswana. In the morning, she dropped her son off at school on her way to work. If she had an early operation, young Mosepele would sit in an office with a window overlooking the OR. more…


Anthony OgwuAnthony Ogwu

It’s hard to write a profile of someone who doesn’t complain, especially when that person encounters innumerable problems on a daily basis and has to solve them quickly and efficiently or important clinical trials will come screeching to a halt. more…


Vladimir NovitskyVladimir Novitsky

Like a lot of boys growing up in the Soviet Union in the 1960s, Vladimir Novitsky wanted to be an astronaut. While his counterparts in the U.S. idolized John Glenn, his hero was Yuri Gagarin, the first man to successfully orbit the Earth. more…


Morgan PackerMorgan Packer

Loading file cabinets onto a truck in Lobatse, Botswana wasn’t in Morgan Packers’ job description. Neither was pressing contractors to bring renovations up to code at the Nyangabgwe Hospital Clinic, but unhesitatingly, she did both. more…



Kelesitse Phiri
Kelesitse Phiri

Oddly enough, Kelesitse Phiri learned about the enormity of the AIDS epidemic in her native Botswana when she was studying at Bryn Mawr College in suburban Philadelphia. The year was 2000. That June UNAIDS released figures showing that Botswana’s adult HIV prevalence at the end of 1999 was 35.8%, the highest in the world. more…


Rebeca PlankRebeca Plank

If it hadn’t been for public health, Rebeca Plank might not have been conceived. Her parents met through a common interest in public health during a medical conference in the late 1960s. more…


Kate PowisKate Powis

Plan A
As a young adult, Kate Powis loved to solve puzzles. Her father was a Secret Service agent and she planned to follow in his footsteps.She took college courses in criminal justice, financing her education by working as a “loss prevention” officer at a chain of department stores. more…


Dr. Raabya RossenkhanRaabya Rossenkha

Raabya Rossenkhan was always interested in science, so majoring in biology at the University of Botswana (UB) was an obvious choice. When she was offered a scholarship to continue her education, she saw the need to study HIV/AIDS. The year was 2003. more…


Roger ShapiroRoger Shapiro

There are not many couples in which both husband and wife are first authors on a paper in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, but Drs.Roger Shapiro and Shahin Lockman are one of them. more…


Kathleen WirthKathleen Wirth

Growing up, Kathleen Wirth knew she wanted to see the world outside of her small hometown of Irmo, South Carolina. She felt she didn’t quite fit in. Her mother’s family had fled from Cuba in 1960. Her grandfather, who’d been a respected doctor in Havana, worked as a hospital janitor until he could qualify to practice medicine in America.  more…